Bridger Teton Backcountry Avalanche Forecast Center Bridger Teton Avalanche Center

TETON AREA NOWCAST
Issued at 02/13/2018 05:58     Valid until: 02/13/2018 23:59

CURRENT CONDITIONS (Mountain Weather Past 24 Hours)

At 10,400' Elevation: 5 AM Temp Max Temp Avg Wind Direction Avg. Wind Speed Max Wind Gust
Rendezvous Summit 8 º F 20 Southwesterly 14 35
 
Location Snowfall/Prec. Total Snow Depth Total Snowfall
At 9,300' Elevation (Raymer Plot) 4"/ 0.20 82" 307"
At 9,580' Elevation (Rendezvous Bowl Plot) 4"/ 0.15" 92" 302"
At 8,800' Elevation (Chief Joseph Plot) 0"/ 0.01" 88" 245"

Mountain Weather Forecast for Today

Skies will be mostly sunny
Temperature Forecast for 8,000´-9,000´: Temperatures will rise into the 20
Ridge Top Wind Forecast for 10,000´: Westerly at 10 to 15 backing towards the southwest and increasing some later in the day
Snowfall Expected Next 24 Hours: 0

GENERAL AVALANCHE HAZARD

High Elevations (9,000´-10,500´) Morning   2-MODERATE Afternoon   2-MODERATE
Mid Elevations (7,500´-9,000´) Morning   2-MODERATE Afternoon   2-MODERATE
Low Elevations (6,000´-7,500´) Morning   1-LOW Afternoon   1-LOW

GENERAL AVALANCHE ADVISORY

Large to very large, persistent deep slab avalanches are still a significant hazard. While the likelihood of triggering these slabs is on a slow decreasing trend, the consequences of being caught remain severe. Conservative terrain choices are recommended. Isolated pockets of surface slab 6 to 18 inches in depth pose a hazard to skiers and riders who venture into extreme terrain (steep chutes, couloirs and cliff areas). Avalanche activity is unlikely below an elevation of 7,500 feet.

TODAY'S AVALANCHE PROBLEMS

PROBLEM TYPE
ASPECT/ELEVATION
CHARACTERISTICS

Persistent Deep Slab

Avalanche problem rose
LIKELIHOOD: Possible
SIZE: Large to Very Large
TREND:Staying Same
PROBLEM DESCRIPTION
Dangerous deep slab avalanches 2 to 6 feet in depth could be human triggered on persistent weak layers that formed in mid-January and December. Large triggers, such as snowmobiles, are more likely to be able to impact these buried weak layers. However, the weight of a single person could still trigger one of these slabs if a shallow weak zone is encountered. Previous tracks on a suspect slope should not be considered to be an indication of stability.
For further information call 307-733-2664 To report an avalanche observation call 307-739-2607
Avalanche Event
Weather/Snow Observation
Snowpit Profile